††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT ASHEVILLE

 ††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† FACULTY SENATE

 

Senate Document Number†† ††1805S

 

Date of Senate Approval†††† 02/10/05††

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Statement of Faculty Senate Action:

 

 

 

APC Document8:††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Changes in Health and Fitness Curriculum:

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Addition of Major in Health and Wellness Promotion;

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Changes to Dance Minor, Sports Medicine Minor,

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† and Health and Wellness Promotion Minor

 

Effective Date: Fall 2005

 

Delete: On pgs. 123-128, the entire section for Health and Fitness (HF)

 

Add:†††† On pg. 123, in place of deleted entry:

††††††††††

Health and Wellness (HW) and Health and Wellness Promotion (HWP)

 

Associate Professor Ray (Chair); Lecturers Cornish, Fox, Pritchett, Schrader, Torbett, White

 

The Department of Health and Wellness offers diverse and flexible programs designed to help students live healthier and more balanced and meaningful lives. Students may choose to major or minor in Health and Wellness Promotion and pursue careers in worksite wellness, hospital-based wellness programs, community health centers, retirement and nursing home wellness programs, commercial and not for-profit health, fitness, and recreation centers, and other related areas. Students who receive a B.S. with a major in Health and Wellness Promotion may choose to pursue graduate and/or professional studies in Health Promotion, Exercise Physiology, Nutrition, Health Education, Gerontology, Public Health, Medicine and other health-related professional programs. Students interested in graduate school should be aware of additional course work required for admission to these programs that may not be required for the Health and Wellness Promotion major. Pre-medicine students may choose any major and should contact the Pre-Health Professions Program Coordinator for additional information.

The Health and Wellness Department also offers minors in Dance and Sports Medicine, and offers a Pre-Health Professions Program. The minor in Dance provides students the opportunity to acquire and refine the technical skills necessary to realize the broadest possible range of movement options, develop their own capacity for expression through dance, understand the connections among the various fields of study involved with dance production, acquire experience as teachers, performers and choreographers and prepare for advanced study in Dance and other related arts. The minor in Sports Medicine places an emphasis on the treatment and prevention of athletic and movement-related injuries. In addition, the Sports Medicine minor provides background for graduate study in Athletic Training, Physical Therapy, and other health sciences. The Pre-Health Professions Program provides numerous opportunities for students to learn more about the broad array of health care career options and assists them in successfully preparing for graduate or professional program admissions.

 

Major in Health and Wellness Promotion

 

In the liberal arts tradition, the major in Health and Wellness Promotion is an interdisciplinary program that prepares students to provide educational, informational, and support services to populations affected by health hazards, or who are at risk for chronic diseases, particularly preventable diseases related to lifestyle. The program includes instruction in health promotion publicity, public relations, personal wellness coaching/counseling, health promotion campaign management, preparation of health promotion teaching aids and instructional materials, and applications to specific public health problems and campaign audiences. The curriculum emphasizes multi-level programs aimed at the promotion of fitness and healthy lifestyles, prevention of childhood and adult obesity, HIV/STD prevention, substance abuse prevention, worksite and senior wellness programming, developing cultural competence, and achieving racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic health parity.

 

I.††† Required courses in the majoró 25 hours: HWP 153, 154 or 155; 182, 225, 253, 310, 325, 380, 420, 459.

II.††† Required courses outside the majoró 23 hours including BIOL 223 or 338; PSYC 320; SOC 221, 312; STAT 185; and a minimum of 6 additional hours selected from the following:HWP 322, 330, 499; BIOL 108; ENVR 130, 336; MMAS 121; MGMT 220, 320, 350, 357, 421, 453; PHIL 213, 303, 309, 313; PSYC 102, 200, 225, 307, 344; SOC 100, 223, 225, 260, 302, 335, 362, 402, 420. Special Topics courses may be substituted with written permission from the program director. Students are encouraged to take BIOL 105 to fulfill the ILS Lab Science requirement.

III.††† Other departmental requirements Ė Major, oral and computer competencies are demonstrated by successful completion of HWP 459 with a grade of C or better. During HWP 459, students will again complete the health risk appraisal and battery of assessments that were required at the time of declaring the major. A comparison between the baseline and this senior assessment, along with an evaluation from each studentís lifestyle coach (advisor) will be factored into demonstration of competency.

 

 

Declaration of Major in Health and Wellness Promotion

Students are prepared, supported, and expected to serve as healthy lifestyle role models. Declaring a major in Health and Wellness Promotion requires the student to

complete a health risk appraisal and a battery of assessments to establish baseline measures related to personal health and wellness. Advisors serve as lifestyle

coaches and use these collected data to work with students to develop reasonable personal health and wellness plans to be followed during their course of study

(wellness plans are adjusted for age and special needs).Before declaring a major, students must satisfy the LANG 120 requirement.

 

Minor in Health and Wellness Promotion

23 hours, including: BIOL 223 or 338; one course from HWP 153, 154 or 155; HWP 182, 225, 253, 325, 420; SOC 221 or 312. Students are encouraged to take BIOL

105 to fulfill the ILS Lab Science requirement.

 

Minor in Dance

22 hours including: DAN 130, 215, 250, 310, 331, 345; completion of one of the following sequences: DAN 135, 235, 335; or 137, 237, 337; or 138, 238, 338; and 6 additional hours from the electives below. Students must choose courses from at least 2 of the 3 elective areas to complete the minor requirements. Special Topics courses may be substituted with written permission from the program director.

 

Technique Electives

Students may choose any technique class not chosen for the required sequence in dance.

 

DAN††††††† 230††††††††††††††† African Dance II (2)

HW †††††††† 111††††††††††††††† Pilates (1)

HW †††††††† 131††††††††††††††† Yoga (1)

HW †††††††† 132††††††††††††††† Tai Chi (1)

 

Related Arts Electives

DAN †††††† 231††††††††††††††† Dance and Drumming (1)

DRAM††††† 103††††††††††††††† Voice Production (1)

DRAM †††† 105††††††††††††††† Theatre Practicum (1)

DRAM †††† 111††††††††††††††† Introduction to Acting I (3)

DRAM †††† 121††††††††††††††† Elements of Production I (3)

DRAM †††† 123††††††††††††††† Design Interaction (3)

DRAM †††† 325††††††††††††††† Costuming (3)

MUSC †††† 101††††††††††††††† Class Piano I (2)

MUSC††††† 103††††††††††††††† Class Guitar I (2)

MUSC †††† 105††††††††††††††† Class Voice I (2)

 

Dance in Context Electives

DAN †††††† 260††††††††††††††† African Dance Repertory (2)

DAN †††††† 261††††††††††††††† Jazz Dance Repertory (2)

DAN †††††† 262††††††††††††††† Modern Dance Repertory (2)

DAN †††††† 263††††††††††††††† Ballet Repertory (2)

DAN †††††† 320††††††††††††††† Composition II (2)

DAN †††††† 341††††††††††††††† Teaching Dance (2)

HWP ††††† 322††††††††††††††† Kinesiology

 

Minor in Sports Medicine

19 hours distributed as follows: HW 220, 320, 321, 421; HWP 322, 420. Students who minor in Sports Medicine are encouraged to take HWP 153, 154, or 155 to meet the Integrative Liberal Studies requirement for Health and Wellness.

 

Elective Skill Development Options (Grading is S/U except for DAN courses)

Only four semester hours of fitness development and/or elective skills courses can be used within the 120 semester hours for a degree. Fall and/or Spring.

 

DAN†††† 130†††††† African Dance I (1)

DAN†††† 135†††††† Jazz I (1)

DAN†††† 137†††††† Modern Dance I (1)

DAN†††† 138†††††† Ballet I (1)†††††††† †††††††††††

HW†††††† 100†††††† Introduction to Rock Climbing (1)

HW ††††† 101†††††† Hiking, Camping and Orienteering (1)

HW ††††† 102†††††† Beginning Kayaking (1)

HW ††††† 103†††††† Mountain Biking (1)

HW ††††† 105†††††† Beginning Volleyball (1)

HW ††††† 111†††††† Pilates (1)

HW ††††† 113†††††† Racquetball (1)

HW ††††† 115†††††† Beginning Tennis (1)

HW ††††† 121†††††† Basketball (1)

HW ††††† 122†††††† Water Aerobics (1)

HW ††††† 123††† †† Aerobics (1)

HW ††††† 124†††††† Weight Training (1)

HW ††††† 125†††††† Kickboxing (1)

HW ††††† 126†††††† Beginning Swimming (1)

HW ††††† 127†††††† Jogging and Aerobic Walking (1)

HW ††††† 131†††††† Tai Chi (1)

HW ††††† 132†††††† Yoga (1)

HW ††††† 133†††††† Meditation (1)

HW ††††† 171-6††† Special Topics in Health and Wellness (1-6)

 

The following courses require successful completion of the specific activity beginning-level course or permission of the instructor.

 

HW ††††† 200†††††† Intermediate Rock Climbing (1)

HW ††††† 205†††††† Intermediate Volleyball (1)

HW ††††† 215†††††† Intermediate Tennis (1)

HW ††††† 226†††††† Intermediate Swimming (1)

HW†††††† 271-6††† Special Topics in Health and Wellness (1-6)

 

Courses in Dance (DAN)††

.

130†††††† African Dance I (1)

Traditional dances of South Africa, West Africa and Haiti. Course includes the healing traditions and expressive movements that are unique to Africaís dance heritage. Fall.††††††††††

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

135 ††††† Jazz I (1)

Historical survey of vernacular dance in the U.S. starting with the African roots of Jazz Dance and continuing with the study of the major social dances

from the 1800ís through contemporary social/street dance.The legacy of vernacular dance in the evolution of Concert Jazz Dance will be examined. No

previous dance training necessary. Fall.

 

††††††††††† 137†††† Modern Dance I (1)

Introduction to Cunningham, Graham and Limon techniques--three of the major techniques of Modern Dance--as a way to compare and contrast aesthetic possibilities of western concert dance.Emphasis will be on individual exploration of movement as a way of understanding oneís physical, social, intellectual, emotional and spiritual dimensions.No previous dance training is necessary.Fall.

 


138†††††† Ballet I (1)

Introduction to classical ballet through technical instruction, anatomical and aesthetic foundation, and elementary vocabulary.Particularly suited to non-dancers interested in developing flexibility and strength. No previous dance training expected. Fall.

 

215†††††† Workshop in Dance (1)

An introduction to the elements, strategies and techniques used in the art of making dances.Classes will include guided exploration and improvisation, and will focus on movement invention rather than movement instruction.Students will explore physical, social and emotional territories through dance invention. Fall.

 

230†††††† African Dance II (2)

This course builds on the foundation laid by DAN 130.Traditional dances of West Africa are the focus of this course, drawing on more complex patterns and more extended sequences.A research component is integral to the course.May be repeated once as subject matter changes. Prerequisite: DAN 130. Spring.

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

231†††††† Dance and Drumming (1)

Students learn the rhythmic structures that drive the dances presented in DAN 230. Students learn to play with the drum ensemble accompanying the

class. Prerequisite: DAN 230; or permission of instructor. See program coordinator.

 

235††††† Jazz Dance II (2)

Building on the historical survey of vernacular dance in DAN 135, students will develop an understanding of and proficiency in the art of contemporary

Jazz Dance as a concert dance form.Focuses on the use of isolations and coordinations unique to concert Jazz Dance. Students will develop improved

strength, flexibility and stamina as well as functional alignment as they become familiar with the classic Jazz postures, positions and vocabulary.

Students will conduct guided research in one aspect of the history of Concert Jazz Dance.Prerequisite: DAN 135.Spring.

 

237††††† Modern Dance II (2)

An intermediate level course that builds on the fundamentals introduced in DAN 137 and extends the dancerís movement vocabulary by introducing

additional techniques of the modern and post-modern periods.Techniques will vary and may include Horton, Hawkins, Dunham, Taylor or Contact

Improvisation.The student is expected to be familiar with the vocabulary of concert dance technique.†† May be repeated once for credit as subject

matter changes. Prerequisite: DAN 137. Spring.

 

238††††† Ballet II (2)

An intermediate level course that builds on the fundamentals introduced in DAN 138. Extends the dancerís movement vocabulary by introducing more

nuanced use of the upper body along with more complicated and extended sequences. Prerequisite: DAN 138. Spring.

 

250††††† Concert Production (2)

Students will assist faculty and guest choreographers in the creation and performance of two pieces.Students will assume some of the duties of

production including publicity, programming, coordination with the technical crew, assisting with lighting and house management, as well as attending

weekly rehearsals. Course may be repeated once for credit. See program coordinator.

 

260††††† African Dance Repertory (2)

Appropriate for advanced students, the repertory class will present students with the opportunity to master either authentic traditional dances of the

African continent or contemporary choreography heavily informed by traditional African dance movement. See program coordinator.

 

261††††† Jazz Dance Repertory (2)

Appropriate for intermediate and advanced dancers, concert Jazz pieces from staged works may be reconstructed and restaged.Original choreography

may be the focus of the semester.Repertory will be shared in public performance at the conclusion of the semester. May be repeated once for credit as

focus changes. Spring

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

††††††††††† 262†††††† Modern Dance Repertory (2)

Appropriate for intermediate and advanced dancers, previously staged modern dances may be reconstructed and restaged.Original choreography may

be the focus of the semester.Repertory will be shared in public performance at the conclusion of the semester. May be repeated once for credit as

focus changes. Spring.††

 

263†††††† Ballet Repertory (2)

Appropriate for intermediate and advanced dancers, previously staged dances rooted in classical ballet vocabulary may be reconstructed and restaged.

Original choreography may be the focus of the semester.Repertory will be shared in public performance at the conclusion of the semester. May be

repeated once for credit as focus changes. Spring.

 

310†††††† Composition I (2)

This course builds on the concepts explored in DAN 215 and assumes a familiarity with the elements of dance and the principles of composition.

Students are expected to present at least one completed piece in the student concert near the conclusion of the semester.Prerequisite: DAN 215.

Spring.

 

320††††† Composition II (2)

Advanced composition course. The goal of the course is to use improvisational structures and choreographic studies to expose, distill, and amplify each

artist's individual voice and aesthetic point of view.Prerequisite: DAN 310.Odd years Fall.

 

331††††† Dance History (2)

Historical survey of dance as a way of understanding the function dance has served and continues to serve the culture from which it springs.Odd years

Spring.

 

335††††† Jazz Dance III (2)

Builds on the fundamentals introduced in DAN 235 and extends the dancerís movement vocabulary with more complex and physically demanding

combinations.The legacy of Concert Jazz in contemporary vernacular dance will be explored and students will complete a choreographic or academic

research project examining this relationship. Prerequisite: DAN 235.Fall.

 

337††††† Modern Dance III (2)

Integrated study of the major techniques of modern dance.Functional alignment, strength, flexibility, and aesthetic design will be emphasized.

Extended sequences will physically and mentally challenge advanced dancers.Students will prepare and present one research project. Prerequisite:

DAN 237.Fall.

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††

338†††††† Ballet III (2)

Advanced level technique course.May be repeated once for credit as focus changes. Prerequisite: DAN 238.Fall.

 

341††††† Teaching Dance (2)

Students will assist in an elementary school classroom where they will act as demonstrators and facilitators of dance. UNCA faculty/student

discussions will address teaching techniques, cueing, styles of correction and observations made in the classroom.Students will complete three

additional hours of service learning in a community setting.Not part of the teacher licensure program. Prerequisite: DAN 335 or 337 or 338.See

program coordinator.

 

345 ††††† Research in Dance (3)

Students will research one dance topic in depth. Research may take the form of choreography, dance film or video, academic research or a combination of presentations. Students will present on-going research in weekly class discussions. Prerequisite: DAN 331. See program coordinator.

 

171-3, 271-3, 371-3, 471-3 Special Topics in Dance (1-3)

Courses not otherwise included in the catalog listing but for which there may be special needs. May be repeated for credit as subject matter changes. See program coordinator.

 

179, 379, 479††† Liberal Studies Colloquia (LS 179, 379, 479)

Colloquia offered to fulfill ILS requirements.See Liberal Studies for course descriptions.May not be used to fulfill major or minor requirements.

 

 

Courses in Health and Wellness Promotion (HWP)

 

152†††††† Health and Fitness (2)

Study of health as influenced by individual behavior and choices. Topics addressed are physical fitness, nutrition, eating disorders, self-esteem, stress management, substance use and abuse, sexual assault and date rape prevention, and HIV/STD prevention. Measurements of individual fitness levels and health habits are conducted. Course includes a comprehensive fitness development experience. Fall and Spring.

 

153 ††††† Health Promotion and Wellness (3)

Theory, research and skills relating to physical fitness, stress management, interpersonal communication and health. Course includes a comprehensive fitness development experience. Fall and Spring.

 

154 ††††† Womenís Health (3)

The study of how women can understand, gain control over, and take responsibility for their bodies and their health. Course includes a comprehensive fitness development experience. Fall and Spring.

 

155 ††††† Menís Health (3)

The study of how men can understand, gain control over, and take responsibility for their bodies and their health. Course includes a comprehensive fitness development experience. Fall and Spring.

 

156 ††††† Career and Educational Decision Making (1)

Designed for students early in their college career, this course examines the process of making healthy college and career decisions. Students will assess their individual values, interests and strengths from a holistic perspective and explore the variety of disciplines and programs represented at UNCA as well as the range of career paths available. Fall.

 

182†††††† Principles of Emergency Medical Care (1)

The study of the critical concepts of responding to medical emergencies.Emphasis is placed on the knowledge and skills necessary to help sustain life and to minimize the pain and consequences of injury or acute illness under differing circumstances and conditions. Qualifies students for CPR certification. Additional topics include prevention of injury and illness, healthy lifestyle awareness, and the assessment of environmental and personal habits to reduce injury and illness. Fall and Spring.

 

220 ††††† Introduction to Sports Medicine (3)

An introduction to principles of sports medicine. Covers such topics as the history of sports medicine, terminology, graduate opportunities, and disciplines involved in the care, prevention and management of injuries. Fall.

 

225†††††† Nutrition and Lifestyle (3)

An introduction to the principles of diet and nutrition science, this course addresses recent issues and controversies on ways that nutrition and diet can promote health and prevent disease.Other topics of interest include multi-cultural views of diet and nutrition, herbs and dietary supplements, and nutrition for activity and exercise.Prerequisite: HWP 153 or 154 or 155. Fall.

†††††††††††††††††††††††

253†††††† Health and Sexuality (3)

An introduction to reproductive anatomy, sexual response, conception, family planning, pregnancy and child birth, sexuality throughout the life cycle, prevention of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, contraception, homosexuality, atypical sexual behavior and sexual victimization.Prerequisite: HWP 153 or 154 or 155. Fall and Spring.

 

††††††††††† 310†††††† Community Outreach and Health Promotion (3)

Essential strategies for determining prevention-related needs for specific populations, designing culturally and educationally appropriate interventions/services, and implementing and evaluating health promotion/disease prevention programs. Use of health risk appraisals to establish baseline and evaluation data and as a motivational tool is reviewed. Principles and efficacy of lifestyle coaching is stressed; extensive role-playing. Additional emphasis is placed on learning how to develop and adapt health education programs, materials, and oral communications to reach audiences of differing literacy levels and cultural backgrounds in an effort to eliminate health disparities among race and class, and to serve an aging population. Prerequisite: HWP 153 or 154 or 155; Pre- or Corequisites: SOC 221, 312. Spring.

 

320 ††††† Advanced Injury Assessment (3)

Advanced study of sports medicine. Helps students develop proficiency in evaluating injuries often seen in the physically active. Emphasis on identifying anatomical structures often involved in injuries, assessment of those injuries and injury recognition. Prerequisites: BIOL 223; HW 220; or permission of instructor. Odd years Fall.

 

321 ††††† Therapeutic Modalities and Rehabilitation (4)

The scientific basis in theory and principle for the treatment and rehabilitation of injuries seen in the physically active. Additional topics include the psychology of injury, the management of pain, and understanding the motivational aspects of dealing with injured individuals. Prerequisites: BIOL 223; HW 220, 320. Even years Spring.

 

322 ††††† Kinesiology (3)

Science of human motion based on the relationship between anatomic and mechanical principles. Emphasis placed on the fundamental mechanical principles involved in movement skills. Quantitative and qualitative problem-solving approaches enable students to apply their understanding of the concepts presented. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 223. Fall.

 

325†††††† Pathophysiology of Chronic Conditions and Illnesses (3)

The study of chronic conditions and illnesses that could be improved or prevented through lifestyle choices. Topics include heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, COPD, overweight and obesity, hypertension, HIV/STDs, arthritis, back pain, osteoporosis, tobacco addiction, alcoholism and other drug addiction, eating disorders, depression, stress and anxiety, suppressed immune function. Emphasis is placed on etiology, current assessment and treatment protocols and efficacy, the use of health risk appraisals, and overlap with health promotion initiatives. Also emphasized are the effects of prolonged stress on immune function and health behavior. Includes research and practice of stress, anxiety, and depression management strategies. The course is designed to prepare students to operate screening programs and make appropriate health care referrals and/or develop individual lifestyle plans. HIPAA requirements are emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 223 or 338. Spring.

 

330 ††††† Peer Education and Health (3)

The study of peer education concepts and programs, especially as they relate to health.Students will assess campus needs which might be met by peer education and develop appropriate programs. The Certified Peer Educator Program will be used in a manner such that students may become nationally certified as a Peer Educator. Topics will include health promotion and wellness, AIDS education, substance abuse education, beginning counseling skills and family systems. Fall and Spring.

 

340 ††††† Career and Life Planning (1)

Focuses on career development after graduation. Students will learn how to convert the liberal arts experience into satisfying work, study and service options. Emphasis on employment strategies, issues related to personal and vocational wellness, and achieving a healthy balance among work, family and leisure roles. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Spring.

 

380 ††††† Internship in Health and Wellness Promotion (3)

Advanced students are placed in an area health and wellness promotion program for experience under professional supervision. Includes reading and biweekly seminar. Prerequisites: HWP 153 or 154 or 155; 182, 225, 253; Pre- or corequisites: HWP 310, 325, 420. See department chair.

 

390†††††† Pre-Health Professions Internship I (3)
An introductory experience for students who qualify on the basis of academic standing, career choice, and personal interview. Students will work with the instructor to be placed in a local area health care setting under professional supervision. Includes research, knowledge and experience to meet specifically selected learning objectives. Requires daily journal entries and final presentation. First in a series of two internship courses. Fall.

 

410†††††† Pre-Health Professions Internship II (3)
Advanced students, who qualify on the basis of academic standing, career choice, and personal interview, will work with the instructor to be placed in a local area health care setting under professional supervision.  Includes research, knowledge and experience to meet specifically selected learning objectives.  Requires daily journal entries and final presentation. Second in a series of two internship courses.  Prerequisite: HW 390.Spring.

 

420 ††††† Exercise Physiology (3)

Study of the physiological reactions to exercise. Emphasis will be placed on muscle metabolism and neurologic stimulation and contraction. Cardiorespiratory responses to exercise as well as the development of nutritional and training programs to enhance these systems will be discussed. Course includes American College of Sports Medicine Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription, training on the proper use of Biometrics Lab equipment, and interpretation of assessment data collected. Prerequisites: BIOL 223. Spring.

 

421 ††††† Seminar in Sports Medicine (3)

Examination of legal, ethical and managerial issues pertaining to sports medicine. Review of NATA competencies and behavioral objectives. Project will involve design of facility including budgeting, bidding, purchasing and staffing. Prerequisites: HW 220, 320, 321. Odd years Spring.

 

459†††††† Senior Seminar in Health and Wellness Promotion (3)

Course gives degree candidates an opportunity to demonstrate competency and serves as the senior capstone experience. Includes four components: (1) completion of a research project or case study in health and wellness promotion; (2) an oral presentation of research findings (in the writing and delivery of their research, students are expected to demonstrate written, oral, and computer competency in addition to content and critical thought mastery); (3) career and/or graduate study plan; (4) evidence of growth in personal health and wellness during their course of study and the completion of a lifestyle plan. Prerequisites: HWP 153 or 154 or 155; 182, 225, 253, 310; Pre- or corequisites: HWP 325, 420. Spring.

499 ††††† Undergraduate Research in Health and Wellness Promotion (1-6)

Independent research under the supervision of a faculty mentor. An IP grade may be awarded at discretion of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours credit. See program director.

 

171-6, 271-6, 371-6, 471-6 Special Topics in Health and Wellness Promotion (1-6)

Courses not otherwise included in the catalog listing but for which there may be special needs.

 

179, 379, 479††† Liberal Studies Colloquia (LS 179, 379, 479)

Colloquia offered to fulfill ILS requirements.See Liberal Studies for course descriptions.May not be used to fulfill major or minor requirements. HWP 479 may not be used by students majoring in Health and Wellness Promotion.

 

 

Impact: The addition of the new degree program in Health and Wellness Promotion will require two additional faculty members who will begin in Fall 2005 (One position is a replacement and the other has been granted by the Position Allocation Committee). Concurrences have been obtained from departments affected by required courses outside the major. Courses with HWP prefix fulfill requirements for the major and will be funded at the category 3 level.All department chairs, who signed the required concurrence, do not anticipate any resource impact on their departments.The additional courses in dance have been offered as special topics and will not require additional faculty or resources.

 

Rationale:Needed new description of Health and Wellness Department in light of new ILS requirements, change in department name, new major, and changes in the minor. Since establishing the Minor in Dance in 1999, the breadth and sophistication of interest in Dance have grown significantly.It is necessary to formally restructure the scope and sequence of the courses offered in the Dance Program. Student interest in more advanced courses prompted the creation of several Special Topics and Independent Study courses that, over time, have become part of the curriculum.