THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT ASHEVILLE

 

FACULTY SENATE

 

Senate Document Number†† 9311S

 

Date of Senate Approval†††† 04/28/11

 

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Statement of Faculty Senate Action:

 

APC Document 78:††††††††††††††††††††††††† Add 1-hour laboratory component to PSYC 321, 327, 333, 344, 368;

††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Change course numbers to 362, 329, 334, 342, 366 respectively

 

Effective Date: Fall 2011

 

 

1.Delete:†††† On page 247, the entry for PSYC 321, Advanced Neuroscience

 

††††††††††††††††††††††† 321 ††††††† Advanced Neuroscience (3)

An evaluation of theories of brain function using current physiological evidence and computational models.Topics include the central and peripheral nervous systems, neuronal functioning, biological and computational models of perception, movement, and cortical organization; higher-level functions, biological bases of mental disorders, neuroscience research methods, and computer simulations of biological phenomena.No credit given to students who have credit for PSYC 320.Prerequisite:PSYC 216, or permission of instructor.Offered every year.

 

†† Add:†† ††††††††††††††† On page 247, in place of deleted entry:

 

††††††††††††††††††††††† 362†††††††† Advanced Neuroscience (4)

Lecture and laboratory emphasize understanding and evaluating theories of brain function using current physiological evidence and computational models.Topics include central and peripheral nervous systems, neuronal structure and functioning, biological and computation models of perception, movement, and cortical organization.Laboratory exercises will provide active experiences with anatomical dissections, computer simulations of neurophysiological phenomena, and contemporary neuroimaging techniques used to collect brain responses.No credit given to students who have credit for PSYC 320 or 321.Prerequisite: PSYC 216 or permission of instructor. See department chair.

 



2.Delete:†††††††††† On page 247, the entry for PSYC 327, Cognitive Psychology

 

††††††††††††††††††††††† 327†††††††† Cognitive Psychology (3)

Historical background and current developments in research and theory in cognitive science, with particular emphasis on attention, memory, problem solving and educational applications.Includes some coverage of artificial intelligence, skill acquisition, and the nature of intelligence.Prerequisites:PSYC 100, 201.Fall or Spring.

 

†††† Add: ††††††††††††††† On page 247, in place of deleted entry:

 

††††††††††††††††††††††† 329†††††††† Cognitive Psychology (4)

Fundamentals of research and theory in cognitive science focusing on the core areas of attention, memory, thinking and reasoning, including perspectives from neuroscience, connectionist models, and artificial intelligence.Topic examples include the role of attention in perceptional processing, the dynamics of short- and long-term memory, the role of short-term memory in purposive behavior, and the use of heuristics in judgment and decision-making.Separate laboratory exercises will require collecting and analyzing data from classic experimental tasks including sensory memory, selective attention, short-memory capability, and stereotype-driven bias in long-term memory.No credit given to students who have credit for PSYC 327. Prerequisites:PSYC 100, 201.See department chair.††

 

 

 

3.Delete:†††††††††† On page 248, the entry for PSYC 333, Psychology of Women:

 

††††††††††††††††††††††† 333†††††††† Psychology of Women (3)

Survey of psychological theory and research on women.Topics include female development, gender comparisons, work experiences, relationships and adjustment.Prerequisite:PSYC 100.3 additional hours in PSYC are recommended.Fall or Spring.

 



†††† Add: ††††††††††††††† On page 248, in place of the deleted entry:

 

††††††††††††††††††††††† 334†††††††† Psychology of Women (4)

An introduction to a wide range of topics pertaining to women and their experiences.Critical emphases include research methods, development of gender identity, gender roles and comparisons, female adolescence, and psychological topics specific to women that are inadequately covered in traditional fields of psychology.The lab component consists of a research project conducted in the psychology of women discipline, with presentation at an on-campus symposium.No credit given to students who have credit for PSYC 333. Prerequisites:PSYC 100, 201.See department chair.††

 

 

 

4.††††††††††† Delete: On page 248, the entry for PSYC 344, Community Psychology:

 

††††††††††††††††††††††† 344†††††††† Community Psychology (3)

An advanced introduction to community psychology, which seeks to enhance the quality of life of communities and people, particularly those considered disenfranchised or disadvantaged.Course topics include human diversity, empowerment, social change, and preventive approaches to mental disorders.Prerequisites:PSYC 100, 200, 201.See department chair.

 

†† Add:†† ††††††††††††††† On page 248, in place of deleted entry:

 

††††††††††††††††††††††† 342†††††††† Community Psychology (4)

An advanced introduction to community psychology, a field that employs research and action to seek positive change for communities and people, particularly those who have been disadvantaged or oppressed (e.g., people living in poverty, people of color, people who are LGBTQ).The course considers limitations of traditional means (such as therapy) for helping people, while introducing theory, research and practice designed to prevent mental disorders and empower disenfranchised people.The lab component provides an opportunity to explore community psychological principles with a service-learning project in the community. No credit given to students who have credit for PSYC 344. Prerequisites:PSYC 100, 201.See department chair.††

 

 

 

5.Delete:†† On page 248, the entry for PSYC 368, Psychology of Close Relationships:

 

††††††††††††††††††††††† 368†††††††† Psychology of Close Relationships (3)

Phenomenology, theory and research on close personal relationships including love, friendship, attraction, intimacy, communication, conflict, loss and grief.Prerequisites:PSYC 100, 200, 201.Fall or Spring.

 

†††† Add:†††††††† On page 248, in place of deleted entry:

†††††††††††††††††††††††

††††††††††††††††††††††† 366†††††††† Psychology of Close Relationships (4)

This course follows the life cycle of intimate relationships: attachment, affiliation, attraction, friendship, love, communication, conflict, and sometimes dissolution, loss and grief.Lab experiences include research on intimacy issues, surveys and observations, presentations, and movies. No credit given to students who have credit for PSYC 368. Prerequisites:PSYC 100, 201.See department chair.

 

 

Impact:

Students will now be required to take two laboratory-based courses instead of one, but the number of courses from which to choose is being increased. No change in faculty or laboratory resources will be required by this change. Most PSYC faculty have several 300-level courses already in their teaching repertoires.An increase in lab courses offerings will impact faculty work load positively, in that faculty will theoretically be able to teach a 4-4-4, or 12-contact hour course load.In the past, lab faculty have been faced with a persistent overload problem, created by having to teach three 3- contact hour courses and one 4- contact hour on a regular basis (total of 13 credit hours).Last but not least, the teaching of four- contact hour courses can be an invigorating and interesting experience for faculty, and we hope to be able to offer that opportunity to more of our faculty.

†††††††

Rationale:

The change to require one more lab course (and one fewer elective course) reflects the departmentís and universityís commitment to hands-on, engaged learning experiences, and the disciplineís emphasis on research and analysis of information.Throughout our curriculum review discussions, two points became clear:1) Our students need additional instruction and exposure to the scientific method, as the basis for the discovery of knowledge in this discipline; and 2) As our students move into upper-class ranks and the 300-level courses, instruction should be more intensive and individualized.